Nutraveris
Thursday, May 31, 2012
Category : CONVICTIONS, CLINICAL EVIDENCE | Author : experts | Comment : No Comments
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EFSA published 2 scientific reports prepared by the University of East Anglia from Norwich (UK) in order to identify health outcomes upon which Dietary Reference Values could potentially be based for 6 minerals: magnesium, potassium, fluoride, chromium, manganese and molybdenum. The systematic searches and reviews were performed using databases Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library Central. Here there are the selected inclusion/exclusion criteria:

– Data published in the English language from 1990 onwards
– Human studies conducted in generally healthy populations
– Studies which examined the relationship between micronutrient intake, status, and/or health
– Studies which were relevant to micronutrient intakes within the normal dietary/physiological range

Overall, the majority of studies identified were assessed as being at risk of bias. In addition, data were limited for the elderly, adolescents and children, with the exception of fluoride studies addressing tooth health. Thus, according to the results, the DRVs could not be established for these minerals. Relevant new data are therefore expected in order to conclude on this subject. Once again it is therefore surprising that, although these studies are biased and cannot be used to establish the VNRs, health claims are authorized for these minerals and can be used with only 15% of the RDAs!

References : Brown T., Mullee A., Collings R., Harvey L., Hooper L. and Fairweather-Tait S. Preparation of an evidence report identifying health outcomes upon which Dietary Reference Values could potentially be based for magnesium, potassium and fluoride. Scientific report submitted to EFSA. Accepted for publication on 14 May 2012.Mullee A., Brown T., Collings R., Harvey L., Hooper L. and Fairweather-Tait S. Preparation of an evidence report identifying health outcomes upon which Dietary Reference Values could potentially be based for chromium, manganese and molybdenum. Scientific report submitted to EFSA. Accepted for publication on 14 May 2012.

Monday, September 20, 2010
Category : CLINICAL EVIDENCE | Author : experts | Comment : No Comments
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This review introduces different non-pharmacological approach to migraine prophylaxis. Among vitamins and other supplements, riboflavin (B2) and coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the frequency of migraine attacks. Alpha lipoic acid also reduced migraine frequency, albeit not significantly as compared to placebo. The prophylactic efficacy of magnesium, particularly for children and menstrually related migraine, has recently been substantiated.
Among the herbal remedies, the efficacy of feverfew was not confirmed in a Cochrane review, probably because of the 400% variations in the dosage of its active principle. Finally, ginkgolide B has proved significantly effective in controlling migraine with aura and pediatric migraine in uncontrolled studies that need a confirmation.

References: Schiapparelli P, Allais G, Castagnoli Gabellari I, Rolando S, Terzi MG, Benedetto C. Non-pharmacological approach to migraine prophylaxis: part II. Neurol Sci. 2010 Jun;31 Suppl 1:S137-9.

Friday, May 14, 2010
Category : Epidemiology, CLINICAL EVIDENCE | Author : experts | Comment : No Comments
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An observational study followed 216 adolescents from birth until about 16 years has established that consumption of fat and magnesium during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy the mother and breastfeeding, influencing health bone of the child.

Indeed, a fat intake was negatively correlated with bone mineral density of femoral neck and spine, in contrast to magnesium and milk which showed positive correlations with bone mineral density of the spine.

Reference : Yin J, Dwyer T, Riley M, Cochrane J, Jones G. “The association between maternal diet during pregnancy and bone mass of the children at age 16”. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb;64(2):131-7. Epub 2009 Sep 16.